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Another Superinjunction? MKII

I have every sympathy for the guy, who has, must, remain nameless. On the basis that there is an on-going legal wrangle and the fact that I was on the receiving end of some “correspondence” from his “advisors”, I’ll tread lightly. Not because of the correspondence (which, by the way, was replied to and legalled from this end), but more to respect the on-going case and, in a strange way, for the individual concerned. I am slightly bemused buy the articles that appeared in both the Times and Independent today regarding what can now only be described as ‘Taxigate’. Both articles kicked off with: “AN internet video clip falsely accusing a student of taxi fare evasion “ I beg to differ, a silent movie is positively not an accusation of an unnamed individual. What’s trying to be accomplished here – the eradication of the clip completely? And, before I receive the same level of correspondence, I fully agree that any page that attempts to implicate a student in a north Dublin college with the clip, should be censured. However, trying to erase the clip off the face of the web is, well wrong and I think futle.

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Irish Newspaper Circulation January 2012

Before we’re all lulled into a false sense of hope, it should be pointed out that historically there is always an uplift in January sales in comparison to December. So, true to form, the market is up over 33,000 month on month. The only sales (due to this natural uplift) worth pointing out would be the Mail on Sunday which gained over 8,000 copies and the Sunday Times who managed to put on over 9,000 copies. The last time the Sunday Times had a sale of that magnitude was back in January 2010, so that’s a very encouraging start to the year. Year on Year the numbers are unimpressive. The Sunday market, paper on paper, looks positive. The combined net gains of the Sunday papers is close to 36,000 copies. But in January 2010 the NoW was selling 122,000, so we can say that about 86,000 of the NoW old purchasers have deserted the market completely.   The Irish Daily Star sales year on year are down nearly 14,000 copies which is by far the worst performing of all the papers. Coupled with trying to fight the tabloid wars on the home front, it is now also having to fight…